• Connect with Dr. Harrison
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
Join the Email List!
My answers to questions on this blog do not constitute medical advice, but are merely meant to create an educational forum for consumers. It is always best to discuss these issues with your health care provider.
Building Resilience in Children and Teens: The Downside of Criticism
April 25 2016

For this pearl, I’m quoting directly from the book Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings, albeit in excerpts.  The chapter on criticism is as amazing as the rest of the book has been.  I’ve distilled down to several critical points that don’t fully capture the chapter, but definitely represent some […]

Read More ...

Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Praise Effort, Not Intelligence or the End Result
April 22 2016

Ok, this was a big one for me.  I think I do a good job of praising effort but I am totally guilty of praising intelligence.  The book Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings does a great job of explaining why this is problematic.   Dr. Ginsburg discusses a really interesting […]

Read More ...

Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Getting Out of the Way
April 19 2016

I’m on Chapter 5 of this fantastic book and it just keeps getting better. As I come across the pearls, I’m writing these quick blogs to share what I’m learning.  I highly recommend you check out the other posts!  Here’s today’s set of goodies quoted directly from the book Building Resilience in Children and Teens:  […]

Read More ...

Building Resilience in Children and Teens — Adolescence: Countering the Negative News
April 16 2016

Ah, dreaded adolescents.  Whelp, that was a Freudian slip!  I meant to say dreaded adolescence, but I guess my fingers typed what I was actually thinking!  I often joke that I will send my kids away from 13-18 and welcome them back once their sense has returned.  Of course it is just a joke, but […]

Read More ...

B.R.E.A.T.H.E.
April 14 2016

B.R.E.A.T.H.E..  Calm-down.  Just take a deep breath.  That’s it.  Count to 5 and just B.R.E.A.T.H.E. How many times have we used this strategy to calm ourselves in the midst of panic? It’s almost reflexive — we repeat in our minds, JUST BREATHE.   Or — if we aren’t able to calm ourselves, someone in our support system quietly […]

Read More ...

The Seven Crucial C’s of Resilience
April 13 2016

Another pearl from this amazing book that I am currently reading-  Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Kids Roots and Wings.  As I come across amazing tidbits, I am passing them along through my blog — sort of like an e-book club.  So here is today’s pearl: The 7 Crucial C’s of Resilience. Each […]

Read More ...

Building Resilience in Children and Teens: 3 Core Concepts
April 10 2016

As my sons quickly approach the tweener years, I am constantly looking for resources to support our goal of raising thoughtful, caring, self-sufficient children with healthy self-esteem.  A colleague loaned me this book by Dr. Ken Ginsburg —  Building Resilience in Childrens and Teens. Once I saw the subtitle, I knew I had to read this […]

Read More ...

How to Treat Antidepressant-Induc​ed Sexual Side Effects
February 9 2016

Psychiatric News gives us a short, but sweet article on what to do when antidepressants cause unwanted sexual side effects.  The highlights: Evaluate sexual functioning prior to starting an antidepressant Talk to patients about the potential sexual side effects of antidepressants If sexual side effects develop, consider monitoring, switching antidepressants or adding medications to counteract […]

Read More ...

ReachMD: Recognition and Management of Mental Illness for the Non-Psychiatric Clinician
January 25 2016

  I had the pleasure of being interviewed by ReachMD’s Dr. Patrice Basanta-Henry on the recognition and management of mental illness for the non-psychiatric clinician.  Highlights include: the importance of non-pyschiatric clinicians in recoginizing mental illness those specific illnesses where there is a higher chance of comorbidity of psychiatric illness best practices & tools for […]

Read More ...

Why Do Older White Men Have A Higher Suicide Risk?
January 12 2016

A recent study published by Silvia Sara Canetto, PhD, professor in the Department of Psychology at Colorado State University finds that older white men have higher suicide rates despite fewer burdens associated with aging.   According to an article on Psychiatry Advisor: Canetto’s research challenges the idea that high suicide rates are inevitable among older white […]

Read More ...